With Intention

Creativity

What To Do When You're Second-Guessing Your Dream

Career, CreativityMarisol DahlComment

Take stock: We often stop enjoying things when there are toxic elements that are ruining it for us. Do the people you live/work with support you? Does your company culture help or keep you from doing great work? Sometimes it’s not your dream that’s the problem—it’s your environment.

Pivot: Sometimes you outgrow your dreams. As Jenny Blake notes in a recent Fast Company article, your plateau isn’t a problem, but a sign of success.*

For many, it's the experience of continually picking up new things and meeting fresh challenges that keeps us going, making the inevitable plateau of success uncomfortable. But that plateau isn't wrong or bad—it's not an indication that you've failed. It's a sign that you've succeeded, and now have to sort out what comes next.

Take a break: As Gala Darling so lovely puts it in When The Flame of Your Passion Starts to Flicker:

We’re taught to push push push, no matter what. The fear is real: ‘If I stop now, will I be forgotten in a week?!’ We think that doing nothing would be worse than burning out, and that only goes to show how desperate our addiction to “doing” is. (If you’re not constantly doing, then there’s time for… Gasp… THOUGHTS! Emotions! Dealing with your actual life! How terrible!)

*For more about this, read PIVOT: The Only Move That Matters Is Your Next One.

 

Three Alternatives to the Morning Routine

Health, CreativityMarisol DahlComment

Morning routines have contributed to the success of some of the greatest minds in history. A solid morning routine helps you direct your day for productive work and healthy living.

I’ve spectacularly failed at establishing a morning routine (not for want of trying). But through the eternal quest to structure the most optimal day, I’ve learned that the key is consistent daily action—at around the same time each day. These actions set the tone and rhythm of your day. They are a mental cue that you are in the moment and doing exactly what you’re supposed to be doing.  And they don’t need to happen in the morning.

Three Alternatives to the Morning Routine

A reading routine: Set aside the same periods of time each day to sneak in some reading. Some ideas: the first half-hour at the beginning or end of the day, your commute to or from work, your afternoon creative siesta.

An inspiration routine: Have a go-to sequence for getting yourself in the right mood and mindset for whatever’s ahead. If you’re visually inspired, take time to browse your favorite Tumblr, flip through magazines, find an artist you love to follow. If you’re verbally inspired, keep a collection of writing you love. If you’re aurally inspired, create go-to Spotify playlists.

A clean-up routine: A set time (or times) during the day for quick clean-up and organization. Take the first five minutes of your work day to organize your desk, or do a rapid-round of pick-up while dinner is cooking in the oven.

How to look forward to everyday

Intelligence, Happiness, Health, CreativityMarisol DahlComment

How to eat healthy: The simple rule of thumb from my osteopath: a plate that is half fruits and veggies, a quarter lean protein, and a quarter starches/complex carbohydrates.

How to read more books: Listen to audio books during your in-between times—in the shower, getting ready in the morning, riding the subway, on line at a store, making dinner.

How to look forward to everyday: Have a creative project that is all yours.